Big Beard Films at Double Negative, Morman Mesa, Nevada, 4 September 2011.

Through the Repellent Fence: A Land Art Film by Sam Douglas has been in the works for five years and premieres at the Museum of Modern Art. The film follows Postcommodity as they create a two-mile long work straddling the U.S.-Mexico border in 2015 to “put land art in a tribal context.” It also includes scenes to expand the land art conversation with Lucy Lippard, Matt Coolidge of the Center for Land Use Interpretation, and Chris Taylor of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech.

The film has also been selected as a Festival Favorite for the SXSW 2017 Film Festival.

Stay tuned to the film’s social feeds for updates on screenings and news. Reach out to the filmmakers with queries to schedule university and museum screenings.

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Found humanitarian water, Two Buttes, New Mexico, 14 October 2016, by Chris Taylor.

Land Arts 2016 Exhibition

Texas Tech University College of Architecture and Museum of Texas Tech University announce the
LAND ARTS 2016 EXHIBITION.

An opening reception will take place from 6-8 p.m. Friday, February 17, 2017, in Leonardo’s Kitchen at the Museum of Texas Tech University at 3301 4th Street in Lubbock, Texas.

The exhibition culminates the semester-long transdisciplinary field program Land Arts of the American West with the Texas Tech University College of Architecture presenting documents, objects and constructions by students Roberto Becerra, Liz Janoff, Matthew Mendez, Kaitlin Pomerantz and Claudia Vásquez. Land Arts is “semester abroad in our own backyard” where architects, artists, and writers camp for two months while traveling 5,820 miles overland to experience major land art monuments—Double Negative, Spiral Jetty, Sun Tunnels—while also visiting sites expanding our understanding of what land art might be such as pre-contact archeology of Chaco Canyon, scientific exploration at the Very Large Array, and military-industrial operations in the Great Salt Lake Desert. To negotiate the multivalent meaning of these places and shed light on strategies to aid their comprehension we invite the wisdom of field guests—writers, artists and interpreters—to join specific portions of our journey. 2016 field guests included Center for Land Use Interpretation director Matt Coolidge, art collective Post Commodity, and writer Lucy Lippard among many others. Land Arts hinges on the primacy of first person experience and the realization that human-land relationships are rarely singular. The Land Arts 2016 Exhibition will continue through April 23, 2017.

Gallery Hours and Events
The exhibition is open Tuesdays through Saturdays 10am – 5pm and Sundays 1-5pm. Admission is free.

###

About Land Arts 2016
The Land Arts 2016 field crew includes Texas Tech architecture graduate student Roberto Becerra, artist and urbanist with BFA from New York University Liz Janoff, San Antonio based artist and writer Matthew Mendez, interdisciplinary artist Kaitlin Pomerantz with an MFA from the University Pennsylvania, and Claudia Vásquez an artist based in Santiago, Chile who joined as a field resident.

Sites on the 2016 itinerary ventured from Chaco Canyon to Muley Point, Spiral Jetty, Antelope Island, Center for Land Use Interpretation Wendover, Sun Tunnels, Double Negative, North rim of the Grand Canyon, Jackpile Mine, SITE Santa Fe, Plains of San Agustin, Very Large Array, White Sands, Cabinetlandia, Mimbres River, Gila Hot Springs, Chiricahua Mountains, Valentine, Marfa and Lubbock.

Field guests for 2016 were musician, artists and performers Terry and Jo Harvey Allen, SIMPARCH artist Steve Badgett, poet and translator Curtis Bauer, Post Commodity members Raven Chacon and Kade Twist,  Center for Land Use Interpretation director Matthew Coolidge, Utah Museum of Fine Arts director Gretchen Dietrich, Big Beard Films director Sam Douglas, artist Boyd Elder, architect and professor Upe Flueckiger, writer Lucy Lippard, writer Barry Lopez, producer and Austin Film Society chief operating officer Sarah Ann Mockbee, cultural activator Andrea Nasher, art historian Monty Paret, artist and filmmaker Deborah Stratman, and Utah Museum of Fine Arts curator Whitney Tassie.

Land Arts 2016 field season was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher. Chris Taylor, director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, leads the program and was assisted in the field by Emily Rabinowitz from Taos and New Jersey.

 

About the College of Architecture
The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock where architectural education has been offered since 1927. The college includes undergraduate, graduate and PhD students and 51 faculty members. Graduate certificate programs are offered in Historic Preservation, Visualization, Community Design, Rural Health Care Design, and Digital Design Fabrication, as well as an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design. To extend the academic offerings on campus every undergraduate student participates in directed summer study abroad offerings in places such as France, South Korea, Spain, and Chile. The presence of Land Arts within the college expands the range of field study connecting teaching and research directly to landscapes we inhabit.

 

About the Museum of Texas Tech University
Established in 1929, the Museum is an educational, scientific, cultural, and research element of Texas Tech University. It is a not-for-profit institution by virtue of being a part of Texas Tech University. The Museum’s purpose is to support the academic and intellectual mission of Texas Tech University through the collection, preservation, documentation, and research of scientific and cultural material and to disseminate information about those collections and their scientific and cultural topics through exhibition, interpretation, and publication for primary, secondary, and higher education students, the scholarly community, and the general public. The Museum aspires to provide the highest standard of excellence in museological ethics and practices, while pursuing continuous improvement, stimulating the greatest quantity of quality research, conservation, interpretation, exhibition, and education, and providing support for faculty, staff, and students. The Museum is a multi-faceted institution that includes the main building, the Helen Devitt Jones Auditorium and Sculpture Court, Moody Planetarium, Natural Science Research Laboratory, and Lubbock Lake Landmark, an archaeological and natural history preserve.

Land Arts 2016 Exhibition at the Museum of Texas Tech University will inaugurate Leonardo’s Kitchen, a gallery of new ideas, research, and creativity established to present a changing array of exhibitions that examine the research and creativity of Texas Tech University across science, technology, engineering, math, humanities, and the arts.

###

For additional information about Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech or to schedule an interview with Chris Taylor contact him by phone at 806-834-1589 or email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu. Information about the College of Architecture can be found at http://arch.ttu.edu, and the Museum of Texas Tech University by visiting https://www.depts.ttu.edu/museumttu/.

 

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Land Arts 2015 Exhibition

Texas Tech University College of Architecture and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts (LHUCA) announce Land Arts 2015 Exhibition. An opening reception will take place from 6-9 p.m. April 1, 2016 at the LHUCA Warehouses at 1001 Mac Davis Lane in Lubbock, Texas.

The exhibition culminates the semester-long transdisciplinary field program Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech in the College of Architecture and presents documents, objects and constructions by Whitman College art and geology student Fiona Bennitt from Bellingham, Washington, artist and Rhode Island School of Design MFA Henry Brown from New York, artist/writer and Bard College MFA Nick Keys from Sydney, Australia, artist and University of California at Riverside graduate student Ashley May from South Deerfield, Massachusetts, and Texas Tech architecture graduate students Mark Freres from San Antonio, Caleb Lightfoot from Midland, and Sadie Richter from Corpus Christi.

Chris Taylor, director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, leads the program and was assisted in the field by Emily Rabinowitz from Taos and New Jersey. Land Arts 2015 field season was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

Students traveled 6,000 miles visiting locations across the Southwest camping for two months as they explored natural and human forces that shape contemporary landscapes—ranging from geology and weather to cigarette butts and hydroelectric dams. The itinerary included: Chaco Caynon, Muley Point, Moon House, Cedar Mesa, Epicenter, Green River, Spiral Jetty, Sun Tunnels, Center for Land Use Interpretation — Wendover, Double Negative, Las Vegas Piece, North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Cebolla Canyon, Jackpile Mine, Laguna Pueblo, Adobe Alliance, Marfa, Plains of San Agustin, Very Large Array, The Lightning Field, Mimbres River, Chiricahua Mountains, Cabinetlandia, Twin Buttes, White Sands, and Lubbock.

The exhibition will open with a reception on Friday, 1 April 2016 from 6 – 9 pm during the First Friday Art Trail. The exhibition will be on view Saturday afternoons from noon to 4pm and by appointment through Friday, 6 May 2016 when the exhibition will close with another First Friday Art Trail reception. To set up an appointment contact Chris Taylor by phone at 806-834-1589 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu.

——

About Land Arts 
Land Arts of the American West is a field program investigating the intersection of geomorphology and human construction. Land art or earthworks begin with the land and extend through the complex social and ecological processes that create landscape. Encompassing constructions that range from petroglyphs to roads, dwellings, monuments and traces of those actions, earthworks show us who we are. Examining gestures small and grand, Land Arts directs our attention from potsherd, cigarette butt, and track in the sand, to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military-industrial installations. Land Arts is a semester abroad in our own back yard investigating the American landscape through immersion, action and reflection.

Land Arts 2015 field season at Texas Tech was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation. The 2015 field crew was composed of three architecture graduate students and four artists. Future years will continue to broaden the transdisciplinary involvement from students across the Texas Tech community and participants from beyond the university.

About the College of Architecture
The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock where architectural education has been offered since 1927. The college includes 650 undergraduate, graduate and PhD students and 50 faculty members. Graduate certificate programs are offered in Historic Preservation, Visualization, Community Design, Rural Health Care Design, and Digital Design Fabrication, as well as an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design. To extend the academic offerings on campus every undergraduate student participates in directed summer study abroad offerings in places such as Paris, Seoul, Seville, Valparaiso and Verona. The presence of Land Arts within the college expands the range of field study connecting teaching and research directly to landscapes we inhabit.

About the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts
The mission of the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts is to inspire and enrich our community by being a catalyst for the arts. Celebrating eleven years of serving our community, LHUCA is proud to announce this fabulous addition of the Warehouses on Mac Davis Lane and Studio Flats as part of the expanding LHUCA Campus. Our campus, located on a two city block area of downtown Lubbock, is the heart of the cultural district. The campus includes the FireHouse Building with a state-of-the-art theatre and four exhibition galleries, the Helen DeVitt Jones Clay Studio, and the IceHouse that provides rehearsal, event and gallery spaces. The Graffiti Building, equipped with a classroom and teaching gallery space, will open in April of this year. The newly acquired Warehouses will provide alternative exhibition and studio spaces for creative works that reach beyond the traditional gallery presentation. Land Arts 2014 Exhibition will continue to demonstrate the flexible use of this space and serve as a magnet for the cultural growth and educational dialog between creator and viewer. The Board of Trustees and staff of LHUCA invite you to join us in celebrating the redevelopment and renovation of the cultural heart of Lubbock.

###

If you would like more information about Land Arts or to schedule an interview with Chris Taylor contact him by phone at 806-834-1589 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu. Additional information about the College of Architecture is at http://arch.ttu.edu, and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts at http://lhuca.org.

Image: Pivotal footprints, Cabinetlandia, New Mexico, 25 October 2015, by Chris Taylor.

Abounaddara, "Once Upon A Time In Syria" (2011)

Abounaddara, “Once Upon A Time In Syria” (2011)

Land Arts is pleased to announce “Abounaddara. The Right to the Image,” an online art exhibition that seeks to illuminate the contemporary conditions of the Syrian revolution, show solidarity with civil society in Syria, and provoke new thinking about media representation. Organized by the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School, Slought, and Project Projects/P! in collaboration with Abounaddara, this virtual, distributed online exhibition seeks to spread awareness of Abounaddara’s widely acclaimed work as an anonymous collective of volunteer, self-taught artists in Syria.

The exhibition will be activated through postings of new work at exactly 12pm noon EST on three Fridays: October 23, October 30, and November 6, 2015.

The Syrian revolution has transformed the political landscape of Europe, the Middle East and now the U.S. As it dominates a global discourse on warfare, migration, and media representation, the only voices still reaching us directly from Syria are those of artists. The exhibition “Abounaddara. The Right to the Image” connects with these voices and demonstrates that cultural institutions care deeply about, and can provide direct access to, issues of great social, political, and cultural urgency. Like the work of Abounaddara itself, the exhibition offers an image of Syrians that respects the complexity of the situation and advances the right to be represented beyond categories of race, religion or political affiliation.

In situations of war and mass violations of human rights, our hyper-mediatized world creates the typical images of victims. We live in a world filled with images that are captured, edited, and published at hyper speeds. The images of the human debris of human madness are too frequently about mutilated and starved bodies, not about persons; they are too frequently images of the dystopian landscapes of wretched camps and the ruins of devastated neighborhoods and not images of the network of social relations and forms of collective cultural and political life that sustains individuals in their struggle for life in dignity and peace. Representations of human suffering and injustice are not only the effects of aesthetic choices; these are also political and ethical choices.

The right to the image finds its legal/ethical foundation in the central principle that ‘every person is entitled to equal concern and respect in the design of the structure of society.’ A broad and inclusive process for the progressive development of a right to the image is possible under existing rules of international human rights law, by deepening a holistic reading of binding international treaties. For example, in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights it is as much implicit in the right to self-determination (Article 1) as it is in the right to privacy (Article 17), or the right to the freedom of opinion and expression (Article 19).

It is as much about individual choice and the dignity of the human person, as it is about the right of a people to freely determine the terms of their political association including issues related to the expression of cultural identity.

— Abounaddara, 2015

Abounaddara is an anonymous collective of volunteer, self-taught artists whose practice is founded on the principle of emergency and an attitude of defiance towards established powers and the culture industry. Since April 2010, Abounaddara has produced self-funded, weekly short films and made them freely available to the public online. These films are anonymous and open-ended. They offer a glimpse of ordinary Syrians without restricting them to political or religious affiliations, while focusing on the details of daily life and evoking horror without ever showing it. The work of Abounaddara thus provides an alternative to the customarily extremely violent representation of the Syrian condition and is generated in close collaboration with the individuals featured in the videos. Abounaddara aims to empower civil society to independently produce its own image. An artistic project that employs the aesthetics of cinema in a spirit of do-it- yourself and disorientation, Abounaddara is also a political project that plays on anonymity and dis-identification to construct a space of resistance. The films do not look to prove a point, but rather to defend the rights of everyone to a dignified image.

For their courageous and groundbreaking work, Abounaddara have been recognized by Human Rights Watch, the Venice Biennale, the Sundance Film Festival (2014 Sundance Short Film Grand Jury Award), the Vera List Center (2014 Vera List Center Prize for Art and Politics), and many others.

Exhibition works

Abounaddara, “The Russian Plane,” (November 6, 2015) Video, 1 minutes, 55 seconds.

Abounaddara, “Return of the Son,” (October 30, 2015) Video, 3 minutes, 27 seconds.

Abounaddara, “The Kid,” (October 23, 2015) Video, 1 minute 36 seconds.

Selection of additional works:
Abounaddara, “The Woman in Pants” (October 25, 2013) Video, 4 minutes.
https://vimeo.com/77826189

Abounaddara, “The Unknown Soldier,” Part 1 (November 23, 2012) Video, 2 minutes.
https://vimeo.com/54135942

Abounaddara, “The Lady of Syria,” Part 1 (February 7, 2014) Video, 4 minutes.
https://vimeo.com/86114065

Abounaddara, “The Sniper” (April 18, 2014) Video, 2 minutes. https://vimeo.com/92318539

Abounaddara, “Kill Them!” (January 16, 2015) Video, 2 minutes. https://vimeo.com/116944509

Credits
Organizing Institution
Vera List Center for Art and Politics, The New School

Contributing Institutions
Slought
Project Projects/P!

Acknowledgments
In conjunction with the second Vera List Center Prize for Art and Politics,
awarded to Abounaddara on October 22, 2015

On the web
vimeo.com/user6924378
abounaddara.com
#Abounaddara
#RightToTheImage
#VeraListCenter

Land Arts 2014 Exhibition

Land Arts 2014 Exhibition

Texas Tech University College of Architecture and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts (LHUCA) announce Land Arts 2014 Exhibition. An opening reception will take place from 6-9 p.m. April 3, 2015 at the LHUCA Warehouses at 1001 Mac Davis Lane in Lubbock, Texas.

The exhibition culminates the semester-long transdisciplinary field program Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech in the College of Architecture and presents documents, objects and constructions architecture graduate students Michael Norris, Gabriela Reyes, and Anthony Zuefeldt with artists J. Eric Simpson  and Rhode Island School of Design alumna Matti Sloman.

Chris Taylor, director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, leads the program and was assisted in the field by Ted Carey from Land Arts 2013, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of the Arts. Land Arts 2014 field season was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

Students traveled 6,000 miles visiting locations across the Southwest camping for two months as they explored natural and human forces that shape contemporary landscapes—ranging from geology and weather to cigarette butts and hydroelectric dams. The itinerary included: White Sands, Cebolla Canyon, Jackpile Mine, Laguna Pueblo, Chaco Canyon, Muley Point, Moon House, Green River, Spiral JettySun Tunnels, Wendover – CLUI, Double NegativeLas Vegas Piece, North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Cabinetlandia, Mimbres River, Chiricahua Mountains, Dipping Vat Tank, Plains of San Agustin, Very Large Array, The Lightning Field, Marfa, Adobe Alliance and Lubbock.

The exhibition will open with a reception on Friday, 3 April 2015 from 6 – 9 pm during the First Friday Art Trail. The exhibition will be on view Saturday afternoons from noon to 4pm and by appointment through Friday, 1 May 2015 when the exhibition will close with another First Friday Art Trail reception. To set up an appointment contact Chris Taylor by phone at 806-834-1589 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu.

——

About Land Arts 
Land Arts of the American West is a field program investigating the intersection of geomorphology and human construction. Land art or earthworks begin with the land and extend through the complex social and ecological processes that create landscape. Encompassing constructions that range from petroglyphs to roads, dwellings, monuments and traces of those actions, earthworks show us who we are. Examining gestures small and grand, Land Arts directs our attention from potsherd, cigarette butt, and track in the sand, to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military-industrial installations. Land Arts is a semester abroad in our own back yard investigating the American landscape through immersion, action and reflection.

Land Arts 2014 field season at Texas Tech was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation. The 2014 field crew included four architecture graduate students and one artist with a Master of Fine Arts from the Rhode Island School of Design. Future years will continue to broaden the transdisciplinary involvement from students across the Texas Tech community and participants from outside the university.

About the College of Architecture
The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock where architectural education has been offered since 1927. The college includes 650 undergraduate, graduate and PhD students and 50 faculty members. Graduate certificate programs are offered in Historic Preservation, Visualization, Community Design, Rural Health Care Design, and Digital Design Fabrication, as well as an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design. To extend the academic offerings on campus every undergraduate student participates in directed summer study abroad offerings in places such as Paris, Seoul, Seville, Valparaiso and Verona. The presence of Land Arts within the college expands the range of field study connecting teaching and research directly to landscapes we inhabit.

About the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts
The mission of the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts is to inspire and enrich our community by being a catalyst for the arts. Celebrating eleven years of serving our community, LHUCA is proud to announce this fabulous addition of the Warehouses on Mac Davis Lane and Studio Flats as part of the expanding LHUCA Campus. Our campus, located on a two city block area of downtown Lubbock, is the heart of the cultural district. The campus includes the FireHouse Building with a state-of-the-art theatre and four exhibition galleries, the Helen DeVitt Jones Clay Studio, and the IceHouse that provides rehearsal, event and gallery spaces. The Graffiti Building, equipped with a classroom and teaching gallery space, will open in April of this year. The newly acquired Warehouses will provide alternative exhibition and studio spaces for creative works that reach beyond the traditional gallery presentation. Land Arts 2014 Exhibition will continue to demonstrate the flexible use of this space and serve as a magnet for the cultural growth and educational dialog between creator and viewer. The Board of Trustees and staff of LHUCA invite you to join us in celebrating the redevelopment and renovation of the cultural heart of Lubbock.

###

If you would like more information about Land Arts or to schedule an interview with Chris Taylor contact him by phone at 806-834-1589 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu. Additional information about the College of Architecture is at http://arch.ttu.edu, and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts at http://lhuca.org.

Image: Above Double Negative, Mormon Mesa, Nevada, 18 September 2014, by Chris Taylor.

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Land Arts of the American West is participating in the TX★13 Texas Biennial by submitting special reports during our 2013 field season. Daily posts will be created by the participants from anything they are working on that day or from the past. Posts will go online when we have signal. All posts can be viewed here and from the rotation schedule below.

Ted Carey — 5 Sept 2013 — Goblin Valley
Jennifer Elsner — 6 Sept 2013 — Rozel Point
Kyle Griesmeyer — 7 Sept 2013 — Rozel Point
Bristen Lee Phillips — 8 Sept 2013 — Wendover
Jana La Brasca — 9 Sept 2013 — Wendover
Jaclyn Pryor– 10 Sept 2013 — Wendover
Ted Carey — 11 Sept 2013 — Wendover
Jennifer Elsner — 12 Sept 2013 — Wendover
Kyle Griesmeyer — 13 Sept 2013 — Wendover
Bristen Lee Phillips — 14 Sept 2013 — Wendover
Jana La Brasca — 15 Sept 2013 — Mormon Mesa
Jaclyn Pryor– 16 Sept 2013 — Mormon Mesa
Ted Carey — 17 Sept 2013 — Mormon Mesa
Jennifer Elsner — 18 Sept 2013 — Point Sublime
Kyle Griesmeyer — 19 Sept 2013 — Point Sublime
Bristen Lee Phillips — 20 Sept 2013 — Point Sublime
Jana La Brasca — 21 Sept 2013 — Cebolla Canyon
Jaclyn Pryor– 22 Sept 2013 — Jackpile Mine / Madrid
Ted Carey — 23 Sept 2013 — Lubbock

Jennifer Elsner — 2 Oct 2013 — Marfa
Kyle Griesmeyer — 3 Oct 2013 — Marfa
Bristen Lee Phillips — 4 Oct 2013 — Marfa
Jana La Brasca — 5 Oct 2013 — Marfa
Jaclyn Pryor– 6 Oct 2013 — Marfa
Ted Carey — 7 Oct 2013 — Hueco Tanks
Jennifer Elsner — 8 Oct 2013 — Hueco Tanks
Kyle Griesmeyer — 9 Oct 2013 — Cabinetlandia
Bristen Lee Phillips — 10 Oct 2013 — Cabinetlandia
Jana La Brasca — 11 Oct 2013 — Cabinetlandia
Jaclyn Pryor– 12 Oct 2013 — Cabinetlandia
Ted Carey — 13 Oct 2013 — Plains of San Agustin
Jennifer Elsner — 14 Oct 2013 — Plains of San Agustin
Kyle Griesmeyer — 15 Oct 2013 — Plains of San Agustin
Bristen Lee Phillips — 16 Oct 2013 — Plains of San Agustin
Jana La Brasca — 17 Oct 2013 — Plains of San Agustin
Jaclyn Pryor– 18 Oct 2013 — Plains of San Agustin
Ted Carey — 19 Oct 2013 — Mimbres River
Jennifer Elsner — 20 Oct 2013 — Mimbres River
Kyle Griesmeyer — 21 Oct 2013 — Mimbres River
Bristen Lee Phillips — 22 Oct 2013 — Mimbres River
Jana La Brasca — 23 Oct 2013 — Chiricahua Mountains
Jaclyn Pryor– 24 Oct 2013 — Chiricahua Mountains
Ted Carey — 25 Oct 2013 — Chiricahua Mountains
Jennifer Elsner — 26 Oct 2013 — Chiricahua Mountains
Kyle Griesmeyer — 27 Oct 2013 — Twin Buttes
Bristen Lee Phillips — 28 Oct 2013 — Twin Buttes
Jana La Brasca — 29 Oct 2013 — Lubbock

Full listing of posts at http://landarts.org/category/field-reports/2013-texas-biennial/

Chris Taylor to lecture at Virginia Commonwealth University

Visiting Jackpile Mine site with Curtis Francisco, Laguna Pueblo.

Visiting Jackpile Mine site with Curtis Francisco, Laguna Pueblo.

Lecture by Chris Taylor
Thursday 21 March 2013 at 4:30pm
Commons Theater
Virginia Commonwealth University
School of the Arts
Department of Graphic Design
325 N. Harrison Street
Richmond, VA 23284

Taylor will talk about the embodied experience accumulated within the last ten years of Land Arts of the American West, the transdisciplinary field program he directs at Texas Tech University that investigates the intersection of human construction and the evolving shape of the planet. Land art or earthworks begin with the land and extend through the complex social and ecological processes that create landscape. Encompassing constructions that range from petroglyphs to roads, dwellings, monuments and traces of those actions, earthworks show us who we are. Examining gestures small and grand, Land Arts directs our attention from potsherd, cigarette butt, and track in the sand, to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military-industrial installations. Land Arts is a semester abroad in our own back yard investigating the American landscape through immersion, action and reflection.

Chris Taylor is an architect, educator and the Director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech University. From this field-based incubator of teaching and research he has published two books on the forces within arid lands across the Americas, bridging the Atacama in Chile with the desert southwest of North America. He is currently working to create the Great Salt Lake Exploration Platform funded in part by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. Taylor is a graduate of the University of Florida and the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University.

Embodied Exploration with Land Arts of the American West

Image of working at Spiral Jetty, Rozel Point, Utah.

Working at the Spiral Jetty, Rozel Point, Utah, 9 Sep 2012.

Lecture by Chris Taylor
Tuesday 12 February 2013 at 6:30pm
Education Building (EDU) TECO room 103
School of Architecture and Community Design
University of South Florida
Tampa, Florida

Taylor will talk about the embodied experience accumulated within the last ten years of Land Arts of the American West, the transdisciplinary field program he directs at Texas Tech University that investigates the intersection of human construction and the evolving shape of the planet. Land art or earthworks begin with the land and extend through the complex social and ecological processes that create landscape. Encompassing constructions that range from petroglyphs to roads, dwellings, monuments and traces of those actions, earthworks show us who we are. Examining gestures small and grand, Land Arts directs our attention from potsherd, cigarette butt, and track in the sand, to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military-industrial installations. Land Arts is a semester abroad in our own back yard investigating the American landscape through immersion, action and reflection.

Chris Taylor is an architect, educator and the Director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech University. From this field-based incubator of teaching and research he has published two books on the forces within arid lands across the Americas, bridging the Atacama in Chile with the desert southwest of North America. He is currently working to create the Great Salt Lake Exploration Platform funded in part by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. Taylor is a graduate of the University of Florida and the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University.

Land Arts 2012 Exhibition

Land Arts 2012 Exhibition

Texas Tech University College of Architecture and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts (LHUCA) announce Land Arts 2012 Exhibition. An opening reception will take place from 6-9 p.m. April 5, 2013 at the LHUCA Warehouses at 1001 Mac Davis Lane in Lubbock, Texas.

The exhibition culminates the semester-long transdisciplinary field program Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech in the College of Architecture and presents documents, objects and constructions by Zoe Berg (art student at University of Texas at Austin), Katy Chrisler (poet with MFA from Writer’s Workshop at University of Iowa), Cade Hammers (architecture student at Texas Tech), Luis Martín Medina (architecture student at Texas Tech), Maura Murnane (New York based artist), Colleen O’Brien (art student at Texas Tech), Jigga Patel (architecture student at Texas Tech), Nicholas Pierce (poetry and creative writing student at Texas Tech), Arie Ruvinsky (artist with BFA from Goldsmiths/University of London), Cecilia Stewart (architecture student at Texas Tech).

Chris Taylor, director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, leads the program and was assisted in the field by Texas Tech alumni Jose Villanueva. Land Arts 2012 field season was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

Students traveled 6,000 miles visiting locations across the Southwest camping for two months as they explored natural and human forces that shape contemporary landscapes—ranging from geology and weather to cigarette butts and hydroelectric dams. The itinerary included: White Sands, Jackpile Mine, Laguna Pueblo, Chaco Canyon, Muley Point, Moon House, Bingham Canyon Mine, Spiral Jetty, Sun Tunnels, Center for Land Use Interpretation Wendover, Double Negative, North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Galisteo, Marfa, Cabinetlandia, Gila Hot Springs, Mimbres River, Chiricahua Mountains, Coolidge Dam on the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation, Plains of San Agustin, Very Large Array, and The Lightning Field.

The exhibition will open with a reception on Friday, 5 April 2013 from 6 – 9 pm in conjunction with the First Friday Art Trail. The exhibition will be on view Saturday afternoons from noon to 4pm and by appointment through Friday, 3 May 2013 when the exhibition will close with another First Friday Art Trail reception. To set up an appointment contact Chris Taylor by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu.

—–

About Land Arts 
Land Arts of the American West is a field program investigating the intersection of geomorphology and human construction. Land art or earthworks begin with the land and extend through the complex social and ecological processes that create landscape. Encompassing constructions that range from petroglyphs to roads, dwellings, monuments and traces of those actions, earthworks show us who we are. Examining gestures small and grand, Land Arts directs our attention from potsherd, cigarette butt, and track in the sand, to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military-industrial installations. Land Arts is a semester abroad in our own back yard investigating the American landscape through immersion, action and reflection.

Land Arts of the American West operates autonomously from the University of New Mexico College of Fine Arts and theTexas Tech University College of Architecture. Land Arts 2012 field season at Texas Tech was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

The 2012 Texas Tech field crew was composed of four architecture, four art, and two poetry students. Future years will continue to broaden the interdisciplinary involvement from students across the Texas Tech community and participants from outside the university.

About the College of Architecture
The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock where architectural education has been offered since 1927. The college includes 850 undergraduate, graduate and PhD students and 50 faculty members. Graduate certificate programs are offered in Historic Preservation, Visualization, Community Design, Rural Health Care Design, and Digital Design Fabrication, as well as an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design. To extend the academic offerings on campus every undergraduate student participates in directed summer study abroad offerings in places such as Montreal, Paris, Seville, Valparaiso and Verona. The presence of Land Arts within the college expands the range of field study connecting teaching and research directly to landscapes we inhabit.

About the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts
The mission of the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts is to inspire and enrich our community by being a catalyst for the arts. Celebrating eleven years of serving our community, LHUCA is proud to announce this fabulous addition of the Warehouses on Mac Davis Lane and Studio Flats as part of the expanding LHUCA Campus. Our campus, located on a two city block area of downtown Lubbock, is the heart of the cultural district. The campus includes the FireHouse Building with a state-of-the-art theatre and four exhibition galleries, the Helen DeVitt Jones Clay Studio, and the IceHouse that provides rehearsal, event and gallery spaces. The Graffiti Building, equipped with a classroom and teaching gallery space, will open in April of this year. The newly acquired Warehouses will provide alternative exhibition and studio spaces for creative works that reach beyond the traditional gallery presentation. Land Arts 2012 Exhibition will continue to demonstrate the flexible use of this space and serve as a magnet for the cultural growth and educational dialog between creator and viewer. The Board of Trustees and staff of LHUCA invite you to join us in celebrating the redevelopment and renovation of the cultural heart of Lubbock.

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If you would like more information about Land Arts or to schedule an interview with Chris Taylor contact him by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu. Additional information about the College of Architecture can be found by contacting Jess Schwintz at 806-742-3169, ext. 247 or visiting http://arch.ttu.edu, and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts by visiting http://lhuca.org.

Image: Working at the Spiral Jetty, Rozel Point, Utah, 9 Sep 2012, by Chris Taylor.