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Found humanitarian water, Two Buttes, New Mexico, 14 October 2016, by Chris Taylor.

Land Arts 2016 Exhibition

Texas Tech University College of Architecture and Museum of Texas Tech University announce the
LAND ARTS 2016 EXHIBITION.

An opening reception will take place from 6-8 p.m. Friday, February 17, 2017, in Leonardo’s Kitchen at the Museum of Texas Tech University at 3301 4th Street in Lubbock, Texas.

The exhibition culminates the semester-long transdisciplinary field program Land Arts of the American West with the Texas Tech University College of Architecture presenting documents, objects and constructions by students Roberto Becerra, Liz Janoff, Matthew Mendez, Kaitlin Pomerantz and Claudia Vásquez. Land Arts is “semester abroad in our own backyard” where architects, artists, and writers camp for two months while traveling 5,820 miles overland to experience major land art monuments—Double Negative, Spiral Jetty, Sun Tunnels—while also visiting sites expanding our understanding of what land art might be such as pre-contact archeology of Chaco Canyon, scientific exploration at the Very Large Array, and military-industrial operations in the Great Salt Lake Desert. To negotiate the multivalent meaning of these places and shed light on strategies to aid their comprehension we invite the wisdom of field guests—writers, artists and interpreters—to join specific portions of our journey. 2016 field guests included Center for Land Use Interpretation director Matt Coolidge, art collective Post Commodity, and writer Lucy Lippard among many others. Land Arts hinges on the primacy of first person experience and the realization that human-land relationships are rarely singular. The Land Arts 2016 Exhibition will continue through April 23, 2017.

Gallery Hours and Events
The exhibition is open Tuesdays through Saturdays 10am – 5pm and Sundays 1-5pm. Admission is free.

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About Land Arts 2016
The Land Arts 2016 field crew includes Texas Tech architecture graduate student Roberto Becerra, artist and urbanist with BFA from New York University Liz Janoff, San Antonio based artist and writer Matthew Mendez, interdisciplinary artist Kaitlin Pomerantz with an MFA from the University Pennsylvania, and Claudia Vásquez an artist based in Santiago, Chile who joined as a field resident.

Sites on the 2016 itinerary ventured from Chaco Canyon to Muley Point, Spiral Jetty, Antelope Island, Center for Land Use Interpretation Wendover, Sun Tunnels, Double Negative, North rim of the Grand Canyon, Jackpile Mine, SITE Santa Fe, Plains of San Agustin, Very Large Array, White Sands, Cabinetlandia, Mimbres River, Gila Hot Springs, Chiricahua Mountains, Valentine, Marfa and Lubbock.

Field guests for 2016 were musician, artists and performers Terry and Jo Harvey Allen, SIMPARCH artist Steve Badgett, poet and translator Curtis Bauer, Post Commodity members Raven Chacon and Kade Twist,  Center for Land Use Interpretation director Matthew Coolidge, Utah Museum of Fine Arts director Gretchen Dietrich, Big Beard Films director Sam Douglas, artist Boyd Elder, architect and professor Upe Flueckiger, writer Lucy Lippard, writer Barry Lopez, producer and Austin Film Society chief operating officer Sarah Ann Mockbee, cultural activator Andrea Nasher, art historian Monty Paret, artist and filmmaker Deborah Stratman, and Utah Museum of Fine Arts curator Whitney Tassie.

Land Arts 2016 field season was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher. Chris Taylor, director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, leads the program and was assisted in the field by Emily Rabinowitz from Taos and New Jersey.

 

About the College of Architecture
The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock where architectural education has been offered since 1927. The college includes undergraduate, graduate and PhD students and 51 faculty members. Graduate certificate programs are offered in Historic Preservation, Visualization, Community Design, Rural Health Care Design, and Digital Design Fabrication, as well as an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design. To extend the academic offerings on campus every undergraduate student participates in directed summer study abroad offerings in places such as France, South Korea, Spain, and Chile. The presence of Land Arts within the college expands the range of field study connecting teaching and research directly to landscapes we inhabit.

 

About the Museum of Texas Tech University
Established in 1929, the Museum is an educational, scientific, cultural, and research element of Texas Tech University. It is a not-for-profit institution by virtue of being a part of Texas Tech University. The Museum’s purpose is to support the academic and intellectual mission of Texas Tech University through the collection, preservation, documentation, and research of scientific and cultural material and to disseminate information about those collections and their scientific and cultural topics through exhibition, interpretation, and publication for primary, secondary, and higher education students, the scholarly community, and the general public. The Museum aspires to provide the highest standard of excellence in museological ethics and practices, while pursuing continuous improvement, stimulating the greatest quantity of quality research, conservation, interpretation, exhibition, and education, and providing support for faculty, staff, and students. The Museum is a multi-faceted institution that includes the main building, the Helen Devitt Jones Auditorium and Sculpture Court, Moody Planetarium, Natural Science Research Laboratory, and Lubbock Lake Landmark, an archaeological and natural history preserve.

Land Arts 2016 Exhibition at the Museum of Texas Tech University will inaugurate Leonardo’s Kitchen, a gallery of new ideas, research, and creativity established to present a changing array of exhibitions that examine the research and creativity of Texas Tech University across science, technology, engineering, math, humanities, and the arts.

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For additional information about Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech or to schedule an interview with Chris Taylor contact him by phone at 806-834-1589 or email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu. Information about the College of Architecture can be found at http://arch.ttu.edu, and the Museum of Texas Tech University by visiting https://www.depts.ttu.edu/museumttu/.

 

Land Arts 2014 Exhibition

Land Arts 2014 Exhibition

Texas Tech University College of Architecture and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts (LHUCA) announce Land Arts 2014 Exhibition. An opening reception will take place from 6-9 p.m. April 3, 2015 at the LHUCA Warehouses at 1001 Mac Davis Lane in Lubbock, Texas.

The exhibition culminates the semester-long transdisciplinary field program Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech in the College of Architecture and presents documents, objects and constructions architecture graduate students Michael Norris, Gabriela Reyes, and Anthony Zuefeldt with artists J. Eric Simpson  and Rhode Island School of Design alumna Matti Sloman.

Chris Taylor, director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, leads the program and was assisted in the field by Ted Carey from Land Arts 2013, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of the Arts. Land Arts 2014 field season was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

Students traveled 6,000 miles visiting locations across the Southwest camping for two months as they explored natural and human forces that shape contemporary landscapes—ranging from geology and weather to cigarette butts and hydroelectric dams. The itinerary included: White Sands, Cebolla Canyon, Jackpile Mine, Laguna Pueblo, Chaco Canyon, Muley Point, Moon House, Green River, Spiral JettySun Tunnels, Wendover – CLUI, Double NegativeLas Vegas Piece, North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Cabinetlandia, Mimbres River, Chiricahua Mountains, Dipping Vat Tank, Plains of San Agustin, Very Large Array, The Lightning Field, Marfa, Adobe Alliance and Lubbock.

The exhibition will open with a reception on Friday, 3 April 2015 from 6 – 9 pm during the First Friday Art Trail. The exhibition will be on view Saturday afternoons from noon to 4pm and by appointment through Friday, 1 May 2015 when the exhibition will close with another First Friday Art Trail reception. To set up an appointment contact Chris Taylor by phone at 806-834-1589 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu.

——

About Land Arts 
Land Arts of the American West is a field program investigating the intersection of geomorphology and human construction. Land art or earthworks begin with the land and extend through the complex social and ecological processes that create landscape. Encompassing constructions that range from petroglyphs to roads, dwellings, monuments and traces of those actions, earthworks show us who we are. Examining gestures small and grand, Land Arts directs our attention from potsherd, cigarette butt, and track in the sand, to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military-industrial installations. Land Arts is a semester abroad in our own back yard investigating the American landscape through immersion, action and reflection.

Land Arts 2014 field season at Texas Tech was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation. The 2014 field crew included four architecture graduate students and one artist with a Master of Fine Arts from the Rhode Island School of Design. Future years will continue to broaden the transdisciplinary involvement from students across the Texas Tech community and participants from outside the university.

About the College of Architecture
The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock where architectural education has been offered since 1927. The college includes 650 undergraduate, graduate and PhD students and 50 faculty members. Graduate certificate programs are offered in Historic Preservation, Visualization, Community Design, Rural Health Care Design, and Digital Design Fabrication, as well as an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design. To extend the academic offerings on campus every undergraduate student participates in directed summer study abroad offerings in places such as Paris, Seoul, Seville, Valparaiso and Verona. The presence of Land Arts within the college expands the range of field study connecting teaching and research directly to landscapes we inhabit.

About the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts
The mission of the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts is to inspire and enrich our community by being a catalyst for the arts. Celebrating eleven years of serving our community, LHUCA is proud to announce this fabulous addition of the Warehouses on Mac Davis Lane and Studio Flats as part of the expanding LHUCA Campus. Our campus, located on a two city block area of downtown Lubbock, is the heart of the cultural district. The campus includes the FireHouse Building with a state-of-the-art theatre and four exhibition galleries, the Helen DeVitt Jones Clay Studio, and the IceHouse that provides rehearsal, event and gallery spaces. The Graffiti Building, equipped with a classroom and teaching gallery space, will open in April of this year. The newly acquired Warehouses will provide alternative exhibition and studio spaces for creative works that reach beyond the traditional gallery presentation. Land Arts 2014 Exhibition will continue to demonstrate the flexible use of this space and serve as a magnet for the cultural growth and educational dialog between creator and viewer. The Board of Trustees and staff of LHUCA invite you to join us in celebrating the redevelopment and renovation of the cultural heart of Lubbock.

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If you would like more information about Land Arts or to schedule an interview with Chris Taylor contact him by phone at 806-834-1589 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu. Additional information about the College of Architecture is at http://arch.ttu.edu, and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts at http://lhuca.org.

Image: Above Double Negative, Mormon Mesa, Nevada, 18 September 2014, by Chris Taylor.

2013 Land Arts card

Land Arts 2013 Exhibition

Texas Tech University College of Architecture and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts (LHUCA) announce Land Arts 2013 Exhibition. An opening reception will take place from 6-9 p.m. April 4, 2014 at the LHUCA Warehouses at 1001 Mac Davis Lane in Lubbock, Texas.

The exhibition culminates the semester-long transdisciplinary field program Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech in the College of Architecture and presents documents, objects and constructions by Edward (Ted) Carey an artist from Philadelphia with an MFA from the University of Pennsylvania, Jennifer Elsner a designer from Richmond, Virginia with an MFA from Cranbrook, Kyle Griesmeyer an architect from Florida pursuing a masters degree at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Jana La Brasca an art historian from California with a bachelors degree from University of California at Berkeley, Bristen Lee Phillips a musician and artist from the Llano Estacado pursuing a bachelors degree at Texas Tech, and Jaclyn Pryor a performance/installation artist from Chicago who has a PhD from the University of Texas at Austin.

Chris Taylor, director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, leads the program and was assisted in the field by Texas Tech alumni Carl Spartz. Land Arts 2013 field season was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

Students traveled 6,000 miles visiting locations across the Southwest camping for two months as they explored natural and human forces that shape contemporary landscapes—ranging from geology and weather to cigarette butts and hydroelectric dams. The itinerary included: White Sands, Chaco Caynon, Muley Point, Moon House, Goblin Valley, Spiral Jetty, Sun Tunnels, Wendover – CLUI, Intrepid Potash, Double Negative, Las Vegas Piece, North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Cebolla Canyon, Jackpile Mine, Laguna Pueblo, Marfa, Huaco Tanks, Cabinetlandia, Plains of San Agustin, Very Large Array, The Lightning Field, Mimbres River, Chiricahua Mountains, Twin Buttes, and Lubbock.

The exhibition will open with a reception on Friday, 4 April 2014 from 6 – 9 pm in conjunction with the First Friday Art Trail. The exhibition will be on view Saturday afternoons from noon to 4pm and by appointment through Friday, 2 May 2014 when the exhibition will close with another First Friday Art Trail reception. To set up an appointment contact Chris Taylor by phone at 806-834-1589 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu.

—–

About Land Arts 
Land Arts of the American West is a field program investigating the intersection of geomorphology and human construction. Land art or earthworks begin with the land and extend through the complex social and ecological processes that create landscape. Encompassing constructions that range from petroglyphs to roads, dwellings, monuments and traces of those actions, earthworks show us who we are. Examining gestures small and grand, Land Arts directs our attention from potsherd, cigarette butt, and track in the sand, to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military-industrial installations. Land Arts is a semester abroad in our own back yard investigating the American landscape through immersion, action and reflection.

Land Arts 2013 field season at Texas Tech was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation. The 2013 Texas Tech field crew was composed of a sculptor, designer, architect, art historian, musician/painter, and performance artist. Future years will continue to broaden the interdisciplinary involvement from students across the Texas Tech community and participants from outside the university.

About the College of Architecture
The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock where architectural education has been offered since 1927. The college includes 850 undergraduate, graduate and PhD students and 50 faculty members. Graduate certificate programs are offered in Historic Preservation, Visualization, Community Design, Rural Health Care Design, and Digital Design Fabrication, as well as an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design. To extend the academic offerings on campus every undergraduate student participates in directed summer study abroad offerings in places such as Montreal, Paris, Seville, Valparaiso and Verona. The presence of Land Arts within the college expands the range of field study connecting teaching and research directly to landscapes we inhabit.

About the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts
The mission of the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts is to inspire and enrich our community by being a catalyst for the arts. Celebrating eleven years of serving our community, LHUCA is proud to announce this fabulous addition of the Warehouses on Mac Davis Lane and Studio Flats as part of the expanding LHUCA Campus. Our campus, located on a two city block area of downtown Lubbock, is the heart of the cultural district. The campus includes the FireHouse Building with a state-of-the-art theatre and four exhibition galleries, the Helen DeVitt Jones Clay Studio, and the IceHouse that provides rehearsal, event and gallery spaces. The Graffiti Building, equipped with a classroom and teaching gallery space, will open in April of this year. The newly acquired Warehouses will provide alternative exhibition and studio spaces for creative works that reach beyond the traditional gallery presentation. Land Arts 2012 Exhibition will continue to demonstrate the flexible use of this space and serve as a magnet for the cultural growth and educational dialog between creator and viewer. The Board of Trustees and staff of LHUCA invite you to join us in celebrating the redevelopment and renovation of the cultural heart of Lubbock.

###

If you would like more information about Land Arts or to schedule an interview with Chris Taylor contact him by phone at 806-834-1589 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu. Additional information about the College of Architecture can be found by visiting http://arch.ttu.edu, and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts by visiting http://lhuca.org.

Image: Twin Buttes camp, near White Sands, New Mexico, 27 October 2013, by Chris Taylor.

Land Arts 2012 Exhibition

Land Arts 2012 Exhibition

Texas Tech University College of Architecture and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts (LHUCA) announce Land Arts 2012 Exhibition. An opening reception will take place from 6-9 p.m. April 5, 2013 at the LHUCA Warehouses at 1001 Mac Davis Lane in Lubbock, Texas.

The exhibition culminates the semester-long transdisciplinary field program Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech in the College of Architecture and presents documents, objects and constructions by Zoe Berg (art student at University of Texas at Austin), Katy Chrisler (poet with MFA from Writer’s Workshop at University of Iowa), Cade Hammers (architecture student at Texas Tech), Luis Martín Medina (architecture student at Texas Tech), Maura Murnane (New York based artist), Colleen O’Brien (art student at Texas Tech), Jigga Patel (architecture student at Texas Tech), Nicholas Pierce (poetry and creative writing student at Texas Tech), Arie Ruvinsky (artist with BFA from Goldsmiths/University of London), Cecilia Stewart (architecture student at Texas Tech).

Chris Taylor, director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, leads the program and was assisted in the field by Texas Tech alumni Jose Villanueva. Land Arts 2012 field season was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

Students traveled 6,000 miles visiting locations across the Southwest camping for two months as they explored natural and human forces that shape contemporary landscapes—ranging from geology and weather to cigarette butts and hydroelectric dams. The itinerary included: White Sands, Jackpile Mine, Laguna Pueblo, Chaco Canyon, Muley Point, Moon House, Bingham Canyon Mine, Spiral Jetty, Sun Tunnels, Center for Land Use Interpretation Wendover, Double Negative, North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Galisteo, Marfa, Cabinetlandia, Gila Hot Springs, Mimbres River, Chiricahua Mountains, Coolidge Dam on the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation, Plains of San Agustin, Very Large Array, and The Lightning Field.

The exhibition will open with a reception on Friday, 5 April 2013 from 6 – 9 pm in conjunction with the First Friday Art Trail. The exhibition will be on view Saturday afternoons from noon to 4pm and by appointment through Friday, 3 May 2013 when the exhibition will close with another First Friday Art Trail reception. To set up an appointment contact Chris Taylor by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu.

—–

About Land Arts 
Land Arts of the American West is a field program investigating the intersection of geomorphology and human construction. Land art or earthworks begin with the land and extend through the complex social and ecological processes that create landscape. Encompassing constructions that range from petroglyphs to roads, dwellings, monuments and traces of those actions, earthworks show us who we are. Examining gestures small and grand, Land Arts directs our attention from potsherd, cigarette butt, and track in the sand, to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military-industrial installations. Land Arts is a semester abroad in our own back yard investigating the American landscape through immersion, action and reflection.

Land Arts of the American West operates autonomously from the University of New Mexico College of Fine Arts and theTexas Tech University College of Architecture. Land Arts 2012 field season at Texas Tech was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

The 2012 Texas Tech field crew was composed of four architecture, four art, and two poetry students. Future years will continue to broaden the interdisciplinary involvement from students across the Texas Tech community and participants from outside the university.

About the College of Architecture
The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock where architectural education has been offered since 1927. The college includes 850 undergraduate, graduate and PhD students and 50 faculty members. Graduate certificate programs are offered in Historic Preservation, Visualization, Community Design, Rural Health Care Design, and Digital Design Fabrication, as well as an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design. To extend the academic offerings on campus every undergraduate student participates in directed summer study abroad offerings in places such as Montreal, Paris, Seville, Valparaiso and Verona. The presence of Land Arts within the college expands the range of field study connecting teaching and research directly to landscapes we inhabit.

About the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts
The mission of the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts is to inspire and enrich our community by being a catalyst for the arts. Celebrating eleven years of serving our community, LHUCA is proud to announce this fabulous addition of the Warehouses on Mac Davis Lane and Studio Flats as part of the expanding LHUCA Campus. Our campus, located on a two city block area of downtown Lubbock, is the heart of the cultural district. The campus includes the FireHouse Building with a state-of-the-art theatre and four exhibition galleries, the Helen DeVitt Jones Clay Studio, and the IceHouse that provides rehearsal, event and gallery spaces. The Graffiti Building, equipped with a classroom and teaching gallery space, will open in April of this year. The newly acquired Warehouses will provide alternative exhibition and studio spaces for creative works that reach beyond the traditional gallery presentation. Land Arts 2012 Exhibition will continue to demonstrate the flexible use of this space and serve as a magnet for the cultural growth and educational dialog between creator and viewer. The Board of Trustees and staff of LHUCA invite you to join us in celebrating the redevelopment and renovation of the cultural heart of Lubbock.

###

If you would like more information about Land Arts or to schedule an interview with Chris Taylor contact him by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu. Additional information about the College of Architecture can be found by contacting Jess Schwintz at 806-742-3169, ext. 247 or visiting http://arch.ttu.edu, and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts by visiting http://lhuca.org.

Image: Working at the Spiral Jetty, Rozel Point, Utah, 9 Sep 2012, by Chris Taylor.

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening – Winston Holloway

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening – Will Cotton and Bethany Woods

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening – Luis Bustamante blindfolding Carl Spartz

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening – Carl Spartz

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition Opening – Long Table Dinner

Fabricating big wall structure.


Assembling the big wall at the LHUCA Warehouses

Assembling the big wall in the LHUCA Warehouses

Big Wall.

Removing two hundred pounds of dust.

Installation of work begins.

Installation work table.

Verifying the lighting.

Lighting the exhibition.

Land Arts 2011 Exhibition

Texas Tech University College of Architecture and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts (LHUCA) announce Land Arts 2011 Exhibition. An opening reception will take place from 6-9 p.m. April 6, 2012 at the new LHUCA Warehouses at 1001 Mac Davis Lane in Lubbock, Texas.

The exhibition culminates the semester-long transdisciplinary field program Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech in the College of Architecture and presents documents, objects and constructions by students Alexander Bingham, Luis Bustamante III, Will Cotton, Winston Holloway, Richard Klaja, Celeste Martinez, Zachary Mitchell, Carl Spartz, Rachael Wilson, and Bethany Wood. Chris Taylor, director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, leads the program and was assisted in the field by Texas Tech alumni Adrian Larriva. Students traveled 6,000 miles visiting locations across the Southwest camping for two months as they explored natural and human forces that shape contemporary landscapes—ranging from geology and weather to cigarette butts and hydroelectric dams. Land Arts 2011 field season was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

The exhibition will open with a reception on Friday, 6 April 2012 from 6 – 9 pm in conjunction with the First Friday Art Trail. The exhibition will be on view through 28 April 2012 on Saturday afternoons from noon to 4pm and by appointment. To set up an appointment contact Chris Taylor by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu.

—–

About Land Arts
Land Arts of the American West is a field program investigating the intersection of geomorphology and human construction. Land art or earthworks begin with the land and extend through the complex social and ecological processes that create landscape. Encompassing constructions that range from petroglyphs to roads, dwellings, monuments and traces of those actions, earthworks show us who we are. Examining gestures small and grand, Land Arts directs our attention from potsherd, cigarette butt, and track in the sand, to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military-industrial installations. Land Arts is a semester abroad in our own back yard investigating the American landscape through immersion, action and reflection.

Land Arts of the American West operates autonomously from the University of New Mexico College of Fine Arts and theTexas Tech University College of Architecture. Land Arts 2010 field season at Texas Tech was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

The 2011 Texas Tech field crew was composed of art and architecture students from Texas Tech. Future years will continue to broaden the transdisciplinary involvement from students across the Texas Tech community and participants from outside the university. The 2011 field itinerary included: White Sands, Chaco Canyon, Jackpile Mine, Laguna Pueblo, The Roden Crater Project, Double Negative, Sun Tunnels, Spiral Jetty, Bingham Canyon MIne, Center for Land Use Interpretation Wendover, Muley Point, Moon House, Marfa, Valentine, Cabinetlandia, Gila Hot Springs, Mimbres River, Chiricahua Mountains, Coolidge Dam on the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation, Plains of San Agustin, Very Large Array, and The Lightning Field.

About the College of Architecture
The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock where architectural education has been offered since 1927. The college includes 850 undergraduate, graduate and PhD students and 50 faculty members. Graduate certificate programs are offered in Historic Preservation, Visualization, Community Design, Rural Health Care Design, and Digital Design Fabrication, as well as an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design. To extend the academic offerings on campus every undergraduate student participates in directed summer study abroad offerings in places such as Montreal, Paris, Seville, Valparaiso and Verona. The presence of Land Arts within the college expands the range of field study connecting teaching and research directly to landscapes we inhabit.

About the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts
The mission of the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts is to inspire and enrich our community by being a catalyst for the arts. Celebrating eleven years of serving our community, LHUCA is proud to announce this fabulous addition of the Warehouses on Mac Davis Lane and Studio Flats as part of the expanding LHUCA Campus. Our campus, located on a two city block area of downtown Lubbock, is the heart of the cultural district. The campus includes the FireHouse Building with a state-of-the-art theatre and four exhibition galleries, the Helen DeVitt Jones Clay Studio, and the IceHouse that provides rehearsal, event and gallery spaces. The Graffiti Building, equipped with a classroom and teaching gallery space, will open in April of this year. The newly acquired Warehouses will provide alternative exhibition and studio spaces for creative works that reach beyond the traditional gallery presentation. Land Arts 2010 Exhibition will demonstrate the flexible use of this space and serve as a magnet for the cultural growth and educational dialog between creator and viewer. The Board of Trustees and staff of LHUCA invite you to join us in celebrating the redevelopment and renovation of the cultural heart of Lubbock.

###

If you would like more information about Land Arts or to schedule an interview with Chris Taylor contact him by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu. Additional information about the College of Architecture can be found by contacting Jess Schwintz at 806-742-3169, ext. 247 or visiting http://arch.ttu.edu, and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts by visiting http://lhuca.org.

20100902_21-25-03_sublime_cjt.jpg

Sunny Tang at Point Sublime, north rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, 
2 September 2010.

Land Arts 2010 Exhibition

Texas Tech University College of Architecture and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts (LHUCA) announce Land Arts 2010 Exhibition. An opening reception will take place from 6-9 p.m. April 1, 2011 at the new LHUCA Warehouses at 1001 Mac Davis Lane in Lubbock, Texas.

The exhibition culminates the semester-long interdisciplinary field program Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech in the College of Architecture and presents documents, objects and constructions by students Cynthia Gabaldon, Gregory Hemmelgarn, Rocio Mendoza, Corinne Sutton, Sunny Tang, Bradley Wilson, with art history graduate student Jennie Lamensdorf from the University of Texas at Austin. Chris Taylor, director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, leads the program and was assisted in the field by Texas Tech alumni Sean Cox. Students traveled 7,000 miles visiting locations across the Southwest camping for two months as they explored natural and human forces that shape contemporary landscapes—ranging from geology and weather to cigarette butts and hydroelectric dams. Land Arts 2010 field season was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

The exhibition will open with a reception on Friday, 1 April 2011 from 6 – 9 pm and close with reception on Friday, 6 May 2011 from 6 – 9 pm, both events will be part of with the First Friday Art Trail. The exhibition will be open for viewing on Saturday afternoons from noon to 4pm and by appointment. To set up an appointment contact Chris Taylor by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu.

Land Arts 2010 Exhibition, with the collaboration of Landmark Arts in the Texas Tech School of Art is a participant in the 2011 Texas Biennial. On April 2, 2011 from noon to midnight, Land Arts of the American West and Landmark Arts will lead a public environmental art action in Lubbock, Texas.

Land Arts 2010 Exhibition will also be open April 14, 2011 from 6:00-8:30 PM, and April 15 from 9:00 to 4:00, in conjunction with the third annual Spring into Green event sponsored by the West Texas Branch of the US Green Building Council. This program in the LHUCA Warehouses will include an exhibit of 2011 Eco-friendly hybrid and electric cars, the Texas Tech Solar Car, plus a Classic ’57 Chevy. For conference information visit Spring into Green.

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About Land Arts
Land Arts of the American West is a field program investigating the intersection of geomorphology and human construction. Land art or earthworks begin with the land and extend through the complex social and ecological processes that create landscape. Encompassing constructions that range from petroglyphs to roads, dwellings, monuments and traces of those actions, earthworks show us who we are. Examining gestures small and grand, Land Arts directs our attention from potsherd, cigarette butt, and track in the sand, to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military-industrial installations. Land Arts is a semester abroad in our own back yard investigating the American landscape through immersion, action and reflection.

Land Arts of the American West operates autonomously from the University of New Mexico College of Fine Arts and theTexas Tech University College of Architecture. Land Arts 2010 field season at Texas Tech was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

The 2010 Texas Tech field crew was composed of architecture students from Texas Tech and one graduate art history student from the University of Texas at Austin. Future years will continue to broaden the interdisciplinary involvement from students across the Texas Tech community and participants from outside the university. The 2010 field itinerary included: White Sands, Chaco Caynon, north rim of the Grand Canyon, Double Negative, Goshute Cave, Center for Land Use Interpretation Wendover Base, Sun Tunnels, Spiral Jetty, Lake Powell, Muley Point, Plains of San Agustin, The Lightning Field, Very Large Array, Cebolla Canyon, Jackpile Mine site at Laguna Pueblo, Chiricahua Mountains, Cabinetlandia, and Marfa, Texas.

About the College of Architecture
The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock where architectural education has been offered since 1927. The college includes 850 undergraduate, graduate and PhD students and 50 faculty members. Graduate certificate programs are offered in Historic Preservation, Visualization, Community Design, Rural Health Care Design, and Digital Design Fabrication, as well as an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design. To extend the academic offerings on campus every undergraduate student participates in directed summer study abroad offerings in places such as Montreal, Paris, Seville, Valparaiso and Verona. The presence of Land Arts within the college expands the range of field study connecting teaching and research directly to landscapes we inhabit.

About Landmark Arts
Landmark Arts, the exhibits and speakers arm of the School of Art at Texas Tech, promotes fine arts growth and development through a comprehensive program of contemporary art exhibitions, symposia, workshops, publications, and hands-on experience with working artists and scholars. Landmark Arts exhibitions and visiting speakers programs are supported by generous grants from the Helen Jones Foundation and The CH Foundation, both of Lubbock. Additional support comes from Cultural Activities Fees administered through the College of Visual & Performing Arts at Texas Tech University.

About the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts
The mission of the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts is to inspire and enrich our community by being a catalyst for the arts. Celebrating eleven years of serving our community, LHUCA is proud to announce this fabulous addition of the Warehouses on Mac Davis Lane and Studio Flats as part of the expanding LHUCA Campus. Our campus, located on a two city block area of downtown Lubbock, is the heart of the cultural district. The campus includes the FireHouse Building with a state-of-the-art theatre and four exhibition galleries, the Helen DeVitt Jones Clay Studio, and the IceHouse that provides rehearsal, event and gallery spaces. The Graffiti Building, equipped with a classroom and teaching gallery space, will open in April of this year. The newly acquired Warehouses will provide alternative exhibition and studio spaces for creative works that reach beyond the traditional gallery presentation. Land Arts 2010 Exhibition will demonstrate the flexible use of this space and serve as a magnet for the cultural growth and educational dialog between creator and viewer. The Board of Trustees and staff of LHUCA invite you to join us in celebrating the redevelopment and renovation of the cultural heart of Lubbock.

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If you would like more information about Land Arts or to schedule an interview with Chris Taylor contact him by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu. Additional information about the College of Architecture can be found by contacting Jess Schwintz at 806-742-3169, ext. 247 or visiting http://arch.ttu.edu, and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts by visiting http://lhuca.org.

Land Arts camp at Cabinetlandia, east of Deming, New Mexico, 14 October 2009.

Land Arts 2009 Exhibition

There is no “I” in Land Arts. Thriving in the desert requires community. 

Texas Tech University College of Architecture and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts (LHUCA) announce Land Arts 2009 Exhibition. An opening reception will take place from 6-9 p.m. February 12 at the new LHUCA Warehouses at 1001 Mac Davis Lane in Lubbock, Texas.

The exhibition culminates Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, a semester-long interdisciplinary field program in the College of Architecture that expands the definition of land art through direct experience of the complex social and ecological processes that shape contemporary landscapes. These forces include everything from geomorphology to human construction, and cigarette butts to hydroelectric dams.

The Land Arts 2009 Exhibition will continue through March 7 and features the work of Adrianna Alter, Sean Cox, Jason Fancher, Meredith James, Adrian Larriva, Kyle Robertson, Jose Villanueva, and Stephen Wollkind. Work was made while camping in the landscape of the American West for 56 nights traveling 7,000 miles during the fall of 2009 with Chris Taylor and Brice Harris. The itinerary included: White Sands, Chaco Canyon, north rim of the Grand Canyon, Goshute Canyon, Double Negative, Sun Tunnels, Spiral Jetty, Center for Land Use Interpretation Wendover, Muley Point, Plains of San Agustin, The Lightning Field, Very Large Array, Gila Wilderness, Chiricahua Mountains, Cabinetlandia, Marfa, Presidio, and concluded with a symposium at the Land Heritage Institute in San Antonio.

The exhibition will launch with an opening reception on Friday, 12 February 2010 from 6 – 9 pm. There will be a closing reception in conjunction with the First Friday Art Trail on Friday, 5 March 2010 from 6 – 9 pm. The exhibition will be open for viewing by appointment and on Saturdays from noon to 5pm. To set up an appointment contact Chris Taylor by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu.

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About Land Arts
Land Arts was founded in 2000 at the University of New Mexico by Bill Gilbert with the assistance of John Wenger. From 2001 to 2007 the program developed as a collaboration co-directed by artist Bill Gilbert and architect Chris Taylor, then at the University of Texas at Austin. During this time Land Arts established a momentum of inquiry and production that has been the subject of many exhibitions and publications.

In 2007 Taylor extended the reach of Land Arts to Chile by leading an interdisciplinary conference in Santiago and a field expedition through the Atacama Desert. The enterprise is documented in the book Incubo Atacama Lab with texts in Spanish and English including a preface by Incubo, introductory essay by Taylor, excerpted field notes by writer William L. Fox, and essays from archeologist Flora Vilches, art historian Gonzalo Pedraza, architect Rodrigo Perez de Arce, geographer Pilar Cereceda, and glaciologist Andres Rivera. It is fully illustrated with photography by Jorge Brantmayer, Blake Gordon, Barbara Palomino, and Chris Taylor.

2008 marked a programmatic expansion for Land Arts with the arrival of Chris Taylor in Lubbock to join the faculty of Texas Tech’s College of Architecture. The Llano Estacado and the College of Architecture provide an ideal laboratory base for the program’s interdisciplinary work. Land Arts now operates autonomously at the University of New Mexico and Texas Tech. The 2009 Lubbock field crew was composed of architecture students and one post graduate from Yale (Meredith James, MFA Sculpture). Future years will include broader interdisciplinary involvement from students across the Texas Tech community in addition to participants from outside the university. The 2009 field season was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher.

In early 2009 the Nevada Museum of Art announced the creation of the new Center for Art + Environment and the acquisition of the archive of Land Arts of the American West. This collection will include artifacts from the development and creation of the program and a commitment to acquire ongoing Land Arts materials.

In 2009 the University of Texas Press published Land Arts of the American West, which recounts the history of collaboration between Bill Gilbert and Chris Taylor as they developed Land Arts. The book is organized around places they visit during field seasons each fall, which come alive through color photographs and descriptive information about natural and human history; first-person experiences from student journal entries; essays by William L. Fox, Ann Reynolds, J.J. Brody, and Lucy Lippard; and interviews with Matthew Coolidge, Mary Lewis Garcia, Graciela Martinez de Gallegos and Hector Gallegos. Woven throughout is a conversation between Taylor, Gilbert, and Fox, about the program’s origins, pedagogic mission, field operations, guests, and future directions. 

About the College of Architecture
The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock where architectural education has been offered since 1927. The college includes 850 undergraduate, graduate and PhD students and 50 faculty members. Graduate certificate programs are offered in Historic Preservation, Visualization, Community Design, Rural Health Care Design, and Digital Design Fabrication, as well as an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design. To extend the academic offerings on campus every forth year student participates in directed summer study abroad offerings in places such as Berlin, Granada, Paris, Seville, and Verona. The introduction of Land Arts within the college offers tremendous opportunities to expand field study and connect teaching and research more directly to the landscapes we inhabit.

About the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts
The mission of the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts is to inspire and enrich our community by being a catalyst for the arts. Celebrating ten years of serving our community, LHUCA is proud to announce this fabulous addition of the Warehouses on Mac Davis Lane as part of the LHUCA Campus. Our campus, located on a two city block area of downtown Lubbock, is the heart of the cultural district. The campus includes the FireHouse Building with a state-of-the-art theatre and four exhibition galleries, the Helen DeVitt Jones Clay Studio, and the IceHouse that provides rehearsal, event and gallery spaces. The Graffiti Building, equipped with a classroom and teaching gallery space, will open in April of this year. The newly acquired Warehouses will provide alternative exhibition and studio spaces for creative works that reach beyond the traditional gallery presentation. Land Arts 2009 Exhibition will demonstrate the flexible use of this space and serve as a magnet for the cultural growth and educational dialog between creator and viewer. The Board of Trustees and staff of LHUCA invite you to join us in celebrating the redevelopment and renovation of the cultural heart of Lubbock.

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If you would like more information about Land Arts or to schedule an interview with Chris Taylor contact him by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu“. Additional information about the College of Architecture can be found by contacting Jess Schwintz at 806-742-3169, ext. 247 or visiting http://arch.ttu.edu, and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts by visiting http://lhuca.org.