A Random Image

Land Arts of the American West is a “semester abroad in our own backyard” attracting architects, artists, and writers (from Texas Tech and beyond) to camp for two months while traveling six-thousand miles overland to experience major land art monuments—Double Negative, Spiral Jetty, Sun Tunnels, The Lightning Field—while also visiting sites to expand our understanding of what land art might be. Our itinerary takes us from the pre-contact archeology at Chaco Canyon to infrastructure at Hoover Dam, from industry at the Bingham Canyon Mine to scientific exploration at the Very Large Array and military-industrial operations in the Great Salt Lake Desert.

To negotiate the multivalent meaning of these places and shed light on strategies to aid their comprehension the Land Arts program invites the wisdom of field guests—writers, artists and interpreters—to join specific portions of our journey. Over the years guests have included art historian Ann Reynolds, Center for Land Use Interpretation director Matt Coolidge, design/builder Jack Sanders, and writer Lucy Lippard among many others. As we travel students make their own work in the landscape to calibrate and test the expanding range of their understanding. The field season concludes when this work is exhibited on the Llano Estacado to the university community and beyond.

Land Arts situates our work within a continuous tradition of land-based operations that is thousands of years old. Analysis of sites visited provides a basis for dialog and invention. Issues of spatial and material vocabulary, constructional logics, and inhabitation serve as the foundation for an investigation through making. Students construct, detail, and document a series of site-base interventions in a context that places emphasis on processes of making, experiential forms of knowing, and transdisciplinary modes of practice. The immersive nature of how we experience the landscape triggers an amalgamated body of inquiry where students have the opportunity of time and space to develop authority in their work through direct action and reflection. Land Arts hinges on the primacy of first person experience and the realization that human-land relationships are rarely singular.

Land Arts was founded in 2000 at the University of New Mexico by Bill Gilbert with the assistance of John Wenger. From 2001 to 2007 the program developed as a collaboration co-directed by Bill Gilbert and Chris Taylor, then at the University of Texas at Austin. In the fall of 2008 Taylor moved to Lubbock and the program operates autonomously from the College of Fine Arts at the University of New Mexico and College of Architecture at the Texas Tech University. For information about the program at UNM see http://landarts.unm.edu/. In January of 2009 the Nevada Museum of Art announced the creation of the new Center for Art + Environment and the acquisition of the archive of Land Arts of the American West.

Operational and curricular material about Land Arts at Texas Tech can be found on the College of Architecture website. This site is updated regularly and if stars align in the future be augmented to provide greater access to the program archive. Please contact Chris Taylor for any queries or additional information.

20110402_19-30-12_ground_sourcing

Ground Sourcing, Lubbock, Texas, 2 April 2011.

2011 Field Season

Information about the 2011 Field Season coursework can be found online at: http://arch.ttu.edu/wiki/Land_Arts_2011

Field Summaries

Journey 1 Summary
Journey 2 Summary

Itinerary

Journey 1
Twin Buttes, White Sands, New Mexico
Chaco Caynon, New Mexico
Cebolla Canyon, New Mexico
Jackpile Mine, Laguna Pueblo, New Mexico
Roden Crater, Arizona
Double Negative, Mormon Mesa, Nevada
Sun Tunnels, near Lucin, Utah
Spiral Jetty, Rozel Point, Great Salt Lake, Utah
Bingham Canyon MIne
Wendover – CLUI, Utah
Muley Point, Cedar Mesa, Utah
Moon House, Cedar Mesa, Utah
Madrid, New Mexico

Journey 2
Marfa, Texas
Valentine, Texas
Cabinetlandia, Deming, New Mexico
Mimbres River, New Mexico
Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona
Coolidge Dam, Arizona
Plains of San Agustin, New Mexico
Very Large Array, near Datil, New Mexico
The Lightning Field, near Quemado, New Mexico
Lubbock, Texas

Detailed itinerary at: Land Arts 2011 Itinerary

Participants

Alexander Bingham
Luis Bustamante III
Will Cotton
Winston Holloway
Richard Klaja
Celeste Martinez
Zachary Mitchell
Carl Spartz
Rachael Wilson
Bethany Wood

Adrian Larriva (Program Assistant)
Chris Taylor (Program Director)

Field Guests

Steve Badgett
Matt Coolidge
Sam Douglas
Boyd Elder
Curtis Francisco
David Gregor
Ann Reynolds
Jack Sanders
Jose Villanueva

20100902_21-25-03_sublime_cjt.jpg

Sunny Tang at Point Sublime, north rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, 
2 September 2010.

Land Arts 2010 Exhibition

Texas Tech University College of Architecture and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts (LHUCA) announce Land Arts 2010 Exhibition. An opening reception will take place from 6-9 p.m. April 1, 2011 at the new LHUCA Warehouses at 1001 Mac Davis Lane in Lubbock, Texas.

The exhibition culminates the semester-long interdisciplinary field program Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech in the College of Architecture and presents documents, objects and constructions by students Cynthia Gabaldon, Gregory Hemmelgarn, Rocio Mendoza, Corinne Sutton, Sunny Tang, Bradley Wilson, with art history graduate student Jennie Lamensdorf from the University of Texas at Austin. Chris Taylor, director of Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, leads the program and was assisted in the field by Texas Tech alumni Sean Cox. Students traveled 7,000 miles visiting locations across the Southwest camping for two months as they explored natural and human forces that shape contemporary landscapes—ranging from geology and weather to cigarette butts and hydroelectric dams. Land Arts 2010 field season was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

The exhibition will open with a reception on Friday, 1 April 2011 from 6 – 9 pm and close with reception on Friday, 6 May 2011 from 6 – 9 pm, both events will be part of with the First Friday Art Trail. The exhibition will be open for viewing on Saturday afternoons from noon to 4pm and by appointment. To set up an appointment contact Chris Taylor by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu.

Land Arts 2010 Exhibition, with the collaboration of Landmark Arts in the Texas Tech School of Art is a participant in the 2011 Texas Biennial. On April 2, 2011 from noon to midnight, Land Arts of the American West and Landmark Arts will lead a public environmental art action in Lubbock, Texas.

Land Arts 2010 Exhibition will also be open April 14, 2011 from 6:00-8:30 PM, and April 15 from 9:00 to 4:00, in conjunction with the third annual Spring into Green event sponsored by the West Texas Branch of the US Green Building Council. This program in the LHUCA Warehouses will include an exhibit of 2011 Eco-friendly hybrid and electric cars, the Texas Tech Solar Car, plus a Classic ’57 Chevy. For conference information visit Spring into Green.

—–

About Land Arts
Land Arts of the American West is a field program investigating the intersection of geomorphology and human construction. Land art or earthworks begin with the land and extend through the complex social and ecological processes that create landscape. Encompassing constructions that range from petroglyphs to roads, dwellings, monuments and traces of those actions, earthworks show us who we are. Examining gestures small and grand, Land Arts directs our attention from potsherd, cigarette butt, and track in the sand, to human settlements, monumental artworks, and military-industrial installations. Land Arts is a semester abroad in our own back yard investigating the American landscape through immersion, action and reflection.

Land Arts of the American West operates autonomously from the University of New Mexico College of Fine Arts and theTexas Tech University College of Architecture. Land Arts 2010 field season at Texas Tech was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher and student support from the James Family Foundation.

The 2010 Texas Tech field crew was composed of architecture students from Texas Tech and one graduate art history student from the University of Texas at Austin. Future years will continue to broaden the interdisciplinary involvement from students across the Texas Tech community and participants from outside the university. The 2010 field itinerary included: White Sands, Chaco Caynon, north rim of the Grand Canyon, Double Negative, Goshute Cave, Center for Land Use Interpretation Wendover Base, Sun Tunnels, Spiral Jetty, Lake Powell, Muley Point, Plains of San Agustin, The Lightning Field, Very Large Array, Cebolla Canyon, Jackpile Mine site at Laguna Pueblo, Chiricahua Mountains, Cabinetlandia, and Marfa, Texas.

About the College of Architecture
The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock where architectural education has been offered since 1927. The college includes 850 undergraduate, graduate and PhD students and 50 faculty members. Graduate certificate programs are offered in Historic Preservation, Visualization, Community Design, Rural Health Care Design, and Digital Design Fabrication, as well as an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design. To extend the academic offerings on campus every undergraduate student participates in directed summer study abroad offerings in places such as Montreal, Paris, Seville, Valparaiso and Verona. The presence of Land Arts within the college expands the range of field study connecting teaching and research directly to landscapes we inhabit.

About Landmark Arts
Landmark Arts, the exhibits and speakers arm of the School of Art at Texas Tech, promotes fine arts growth and development through a comprehensive program of contemporary art exhibitions, symposia, workshops, publications, and hands-on experience with working artists and scholars. Landmark Arts exhibitions and visiting speakers programs are supported by generous grants from the Helen Jones Foundation and The CH Foundation, both of Lubbock. Additional support comes from Cultural Activities Fees administered through the College of Visual & Performing Arts at Texas Tech University.

About the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts
The mission of the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts is to inspire and enrich our community by being a catalyst for the arts. Celebrating eleven years of serving our community, LHUCA is proud to announce this fabulous addition of the Warehouses on Mac Davis Lane and Studio Flats as part of the expanding LHUCA Campus. Our campus, located on a two city block area of downtown Lubbock, is the heart of the cultural district. The campus includes the FireHouse Building with a state-of-the-art theatre and four exhibition galleries, the Helen DeVitt Jones Clay Studio, and the IceHouse that provides rehearsal, event and gallery spaces. The Graffiti Building, equipped with a classroom and teaching gallery space, will open in April of this year. The newly acquired Warehouses will provide alternative exhibition and studio spaces for creative works that reach beyond the traditional gallery presentation. Land Arts 2010 Exhibition will demonstrate the flexible use of this space and serve as a magnet for the cultural growth and educational dialog between creator and viewer. The Board of Trustees and staff of LHUCA invite you to join us in celebrating the redevelopment and renovation of the cultural heart of Lubbock.

###

If you would like more information about Land Arts or to schedule an interview with Chris Taylor contact him by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu. Additional information about the College of Architecture can be found by contacting Jess Schwintz at 806-742-3169, ext. 247 or visiting http://arch.ttu.edu, and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts by visiting http://lhuca.org.

2010 Field Season

Information about the 2011 Field Season coursework can be found online at: http://arch.ttu.edu/wiki/Land_Arts_2010

Itinerary

Journey 1
Twin Buttes, White Sands, New Mexico
Chaco Caynon, New Mexico
Fire Point, Grand Canyon North Rim, Arizona
Double Negative, Mormon Mesa, Nevada
Goshute Canyon, Nevada
Wendover – CLUI, Utah
Sun Tunnels, near Lucin, Utah
Spiral Jetty, Rozel Point, Great Salt Lake, Utah
Blue Notch, Lake Powell, Utah
Muley Point, Cedar Mesa, Utah
Madrid, New Mexico

Journey 2
Plains of San Agustin, New Mexico
The Lightning Field, near Quemado, New Mexico
Very Large Array, near Datil, New Mexico
Cebolla Canyon, New Mexico
Jackpile Mine, Laguna Pueblo, New Mexico
Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona
Cabinetlandia, Deming, New Mexico
Marfa, Texas
Presidio, Texas
Lubbock, Texas

Participants

Cynthia Gabaldon
Greg Hemmelgarn
Jennie Lamensdorf
Rocio Mendoza
Corinne Sutton
Sunny Tang
Bradley Wilson

Sean Cox (Program Assistant)
Natalie Bradshaw (Program Assistant)
Chris Taylor (Program Director)

Field Guests

Steve Badgett
Chris Calott
Matt Coolidge
Sam Douglas
Boyd Elder
Curtis Francisco
Bill Fox
Eve Andree Laramee
Onézieme Mouton
Lea Rekow
Ann Reynolds
Lori Ryker
Jack Sanders

Land Arts camp at Cabinetlandia, east of Deming, New Mexico, 14 October 2009.

Land Arts 2009 Exhibition

There is no “I” in Land Arts. Thriving in the desert requires community. 

Texas Tech University College of Architecture and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts (LHUCA) announce Land Arts 2009 Exhibition. An opening reception will take place from 6-9 p.m. February 12 at the new LHUCA Warehouses at 1001 Mac Davis Lane in Lubbock, Texas.

The exhibition culminates Land Arts of the American West at Texas Tech, a semester-long interdisciplinary field program in the College of Architecture that expands the definition of land art through direct experience of the complex social and ecological processes that shape contemporary landscapes. These forces include everything from geomorphology to human construction, and cigarette butts to hydroelectric dams.

The Land Arts 2009 Exhibition will continue through March 7 and features the work of Adrianna Alter, Sean Cox, Jason Fancher, Meredith James, Adrian Larriva, Kyle Robertson, Jose Villanueva, and Stephen Wollkind. Work was made while camping in the landscape of the American West for 56 nights traveling 7,000 miles during the fall of 2009 with Chris Taylor and Brice Harris. The itinerary included: White Sands, Chaco Canyon, north rim of the Grand Canyon, Goshute Canyon, Double Negative, Sun Tunnels, Spiral Jetty, Center for Land Use Interpretation Wendover, Muley Point, Plains of San Agustin, The Lightning Field, Very Large Array, Gila Wilderness, Chiricahua Mountains, Cabinetlandia, Marfa, Presidio, and concluded with a symposium at the Land Heritage Institute in San Antonio.

The exhibition will launch with an opening reception on Friday, 12 February 2010 from 6 – 9 pm. There will be a closing reception in conjunction with the First Friday Art Trail on Friday, 5 March 2010 from 6 – 9 pm. The exhibition will be open for viewing by appointment and on Saturdays from noon to 5pm. To set up an appointment contact Chris Taylor by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu.

—–

About Land Arts
Land Arts was founded in 2000 at the University of New Mexico by Bill Gilbert with the assistance of John Wenger. From 2001 to 2007 the program developed as a collaboration co-directed by artist Bill Gilbert and architect Chris Taylor, then at the University of Texas at Austin. During this time Land Arts established a momentum of inquiry and production that has been the subject of many exhibitions and publications.

In 2007 Taylor extended the reach of Land Arts to Chile by leading an interdisciplinary conference in Santiago and a field expedition through the Atacama Desert. The enterprise is documented in the book Incubo Atacama Lab with texts in Spanish and English including a preface by Incubo, introductory essay by Taylor, excerpted field notes by writer William L. Fox, and essays from archeologist Flora Vilches, art historian Gonzalo Pedraza, architect Rodrigo Perez de Arce, geographer Pilar Cereceda, and glaciologist Andres Rivera. It is fully illustrated with photography by Jorge Brantmayer, Blake Gordon, Barbara Palomino, and Chris Taylor.

2008 marked a programmatic expansion for Land Arts with the arrival of Chris Taylor in Lubbock to join the faculty of Texas Tech’s College of Architecture. The Llano Estacado and the College of Architecture provide an ideal laboratory base for the program’s interdisciplinary work. Land Arts now operates autonomously at the University of New Mexico and Texas Tech. The 2009 Lubbock field crew was composed of architecture students and one post graduate from Yale (Meredith James, MFA Sculpture). Future years will include broader interdisciplinary involvement from students across the Texas Tech community in addition to participants from outside the university. The 2009 field season was made possible with generous operational support from Andrea Nasher.

In early 2009 the Nevada Museum of Art announced the creation of the new Center for Art + Environment and the acquisition of the archive of Land Arts of the American West. This collection will include artifacts from the development and creation of the program and a commitment to acquire ongoing Land Arts materials.

In 2009 the University of Texas Press published Land Arts of the American West, which recounts the history of collaboration between Bill Gilbert and Chris Taylor as they developed Land Arts. The book is organized around places they visit during field seasons each fall, which come alive through color photographs and descriptive information about natural and human history; first-person experiences from student journal entries; essays by William L. Fox, Ann Reynolds, J.J. Brody, and Lucy Lippard; and interviews with Matthew Coolidge, Mary Lewis Garcia, Graciela Martinez de Gallegos and Hector Gallegos. Woven throughout is a conversation between Taylor, Gilbert, and Fox, about the program’s origins, pedagogic mission, field operations, guests, and future directions. 

About the College of Architecture
The College of Architecture at Texas Tech University is located in Lubbock where architectural education has been offered since 1927. The college includes 850 undergraduate, graduate and PhD students and 50 faculty members. Graduate certificate programs are offered in Historic Preservation, Visualization, Community Design, Rural Health Care Design, and Digital Design Fabrication, as well as an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Land-Use Planning, Management, and Design. To extend the academic offerings on campus every forth year student participates in directed summer study abroad offerings in places such as Berlin, Granada, Paris, Seville, and Verona. The introduction of Land Arts within the college offers tremendous opportunities to expand field study and connect teaching and research more directly to the landscapes we inhabit.

About the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts
The mission of the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts is to inspire and enrich our community by being a catalyst for the arts. Celebrating ten years of serving our community, LHUCA is proud to announce this fabulous addition of the Warehouses on Mac Davis Lane as part of the LHUCA Campus. Our campus, located on a two city block area of downtown Lubbock, is the heart of the cultural district. The campus includes the FireHouse Building with a state-of-the-art theatre and four exhibition galleries, the Helen DeVitt Jones Clay Studio, and the IceHouse that provides rehearsal, event and gallery spaces. The Graffiti Building, equipped with a classroom and teaching gallery space, will open in April of this year. The newly acquired Warehouses will provide alternative exhibition and studio spaces for creative works that reach beyond the traditional gallery presentation. Land Arts 2009 Exhibition will demonstrate the flexible use of this space and serve as a magnet for the cultural growth and educational dialog between creator and viewer. The Board of Trustees and staff of LHUCA invite you to join us in celebrating the redevelopment and renovation of the cultural heart of Lubbock.

###

If you would like more information about Land Arts or to schedule an interview with Chris Taylor contact him by phone at 806-392-6147 or by email at chris.taylor@ttu.edu“. Additional information about the College of Architecture can be found by contacting Jess Schwintz at 806-742-3169, ext. 247 or visiting http://arch.ttu.edu, and the Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts by visiting http://lhuca.org.

2009 Field Season

Information about the 2011 Field Season coursework can be found online at: http://arch.ttu.edu/wiki/Land_Arts_2009

Itinerary

Journey 1
Twin Buttes, White Sands, New Mexico
Chaco Caynon, New Mexico
Fire Point, Grand Canyon North Rim, Arizona
Double Negative, Mormon Mesa, Nevada
Goshute Canyon, Nevada
Sun Tunnels, near Lucin, Utah
Spiral Jetty, Rozel Point, Great Salt Lake, Utah
Wendover – CLUI, Utah
Muley Point, Cedar Mesa, Utah
Madrid, New Mexico

Journey 2
Plains of San Agustin, New Mexico
The Lightning Field, near Quemado, New Mexico
Very Large Array, near Datil, New Mexico
Mimbres River, Gila Wilderness, New Mexico
Gila Cliff Dwellings, New Mexico
Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona
Cabinetlandia, Deming, New Mexico
Marfa, Texas
Presidio, Texas
Land Heritage Institute, San Antonio, Texas
Lubbock, Texas

Participants

Adrianna Alter
Sean Cox
Jason Fancher
Meredith James
Adrian Larriva
Kyle Robertson
Jose Villanueva
Stephen Wollkind

Brice Harris (Program Assistant)
Chris Taylor (Program Director)

Field Guests

Steve Badgett
Penelope Boyer
Matt Coolidge
Rick Dingus
Boyd Elder
Clifton Ellis
Upe Flueckiger
Bill Fox
David Gregor
Joan Jonas
Erik Knutzen
Lucy Lippard
Susannah Mira
Ann Reynolds
Jack Sanders
Chris Snowden
Simone Swan

Land Arts book

Land Arts book, 2009.

Land Arts Book

In 2009 the University of Texas Press published the book Land Arts of the American West presenting the history of collaboration between Bill Gilbert and Chris Taylor as they developed the program. The book is organized around places they visited during field seasons each fall, which come alive through color photographs and descriptive information about natural and human history; first-person experiences from student journal entries; essays by William L. Fox, Ann Reynolds, J.J. Brody, and Lucy Lippard; and interviews with Mary Lewis Garcia, Graciela Martinez de Gallegos and Hector Gallegos, and Matthew Coolidge. Woven throughout is a conversation among Taylor, Gilbert, and Fox, who draws the authors out to describe the program’s origins, pedagogic mission, field operations, interactions with guests, and future directions. 

University of Texas Press, April 2009
8 x 10 inches, 384 pp., 441 color illus.
ISBN: 978-0-292-71672-8